One Good Book

Share Button

One Good Book

That’s how it begins.

The first step toward a life of fulfilling, avid reading.

The only thing better than your first good book as a child is your next good book, today.

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Book x 10 = 10 Books

That first good book plus nine more good books … Research has shown that 10 books added to a family home that previously was devoid of books doubles the likelihood that the children of that family will finish high school.

Just 10 books in a home is all it takes. *

10

 

10 Books x 10 = 100 Books

Each book brought home adds new ideas, experiences, evidence, perspectives, information, connections and images to a household. Books actually change the conversation in the home. Each additional book enriches the breadth and depth of conversation. They help create the kind of Family Scholarly Culture* that equips children with a rich fund of world information and a range of vicarious experiences as a foundation for their studies. Research indicates that 100 books in a home maximizes the likelihood of school success for a family’s children.  Here are 100 of our book covers.

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 100 Books x 10 = 1,000 Books – A Lifetime of Reading

If a person reads one book each month for their entire lives, that’s about 1,000 books read over the course of a lifetime. Here you see two versions of that collection.

The first shows the above 100 Unite for Literacy library books multiplied by 10 and arranged into 10 layers. For perspective, next to that is 1,000 actual books on a bookshelf, a legacy of learning and laughter only available through the joyful reading of books.

1000

1000 Bookshelf image1,000 Book x 10 = 10,000 Books

To display 10,000 books we have to begin to challenge your eyesight and squeeze your imagination a bit. Each of these 10 stacks equals 1,000 books.

By consistently  increasing our book display images in factors of 10,  you can see the pattern developing here.

 

10k c

 

10,000 Books x 10 = 100,000 Books

This graphic shows 10 copies of the image above. That many stacked books is probably higher than the ceiling of the room in which you are sitting right now.

Who on earth could EVER read 100,000 books?

Well, as a matter of fact, the families, children and English language learners who come to the Unite for Literacy library are now reading an average of 100,000 books every month.

100000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100,000 x 10 = A Million Books Read!

Most people struggle to envision a million of anything. The following shows how 1,000,000 books might appear if we stacked them all tidy and neat. Each row equals 10,000 books. In printed form, each of those 100,000 stacks is about 10 feet tall. Ten of those is equivalent in height to a 10-story building.

As of this week, 1,000,000 also is the total number of Unite for Literacy library books enjoyed by our readers. Those are children in families in 60 percent of the counties in the United States and in more than 50 percent of the countries in the world.

Scroll down to appreciate how many that really is. It’s way cool!

one milld 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s pretty special, really…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Envision all of these books in the laps of children around the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But this first million has delighted just a fraction of the children out there who need books to learn to read and to become avid readers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Would you like to see more children reading?

 

More children becoming literate?

 

More children doing well in school?

 

Well, of course you would!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, please share these global public goods with every parent of small children; every ELL, preschool and primary teacher; and every family learning English.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Together we can make a difference everywhere.

Unite for Literacy.

 

*Evans, M.; Kelley, J.; Sikora, J. & Treiman, D. J. (2010), ‘Family scholarly culture and educational success: Books and schooling in 27 nations’, Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 28 (2) , 171 – 197 .