Tag Archives: library

Monster Reader

The Problem With Reading Rewards

This week I happened upon a terrific article in The New York Times about summer reading. It is about rewarding kids for reading. The article’s headline (shown here) caught my attention because my experience is also that rewards for reading rarely have positive outcomes. The article made me reflect upon the important difference between children who can read and child avid readers.  As most healthy library systems do, in my town, Louisville, Kentucky’s fabulous library has a “summer reading” program. It serves as a lure to get […]

Librarian 1

Need a life transition resource? Book it to a library.

When the kids graduate high school or just leave formal schooling, what is the most important resource that they will leverage to continue learning about…well, anything? Beyond their peers who also are searching for answers, what is the first go-to resource for young adults to begin the lifelong journey of shaping their very own, wonderful and […]

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Simply the Best 

I recently read that National Public Radio’s expert panel (with input from 7000 listeners) had judged and selected the members of a collection of what they call the 100 funniest books ever. The books are presented in categories with book covers and nice paragraphs to capture imaginations about what delights are to be found in each one.   I […]

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School Library ≠ Book Warehouse

There seem to be two competing agendas operating in lots of schools with tight budgets. Literacy learning is a top funding priority in our school. The librarian costs too much, so we should just hire a clerk or use the library as a study hall. Pick one. We can’t promote both of these. The research […]

Standards Cover

Libraries – the Ultimate Sources for New Possibilities

I’m not one that is enthralled by time sensitive school test scores if I can get any better gauge of the enduring effects of a school’s literacy program. For example, the circulation figures from a classroom’s library or the whole school library are an excellent indication of the effects that the school is having on children becoming […]

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We Need a New Library….!

In April the American Library Association published its annual State of America’s Libraries report. This comprehensive look at trends and issues related to libraries and their full usage is an essential resource for those interested in sustainable and fully accessible libraries for all communities and certainly for all schools. As we approach the start of […]

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Yes! They Need to Talk About It.

The ultimate goal of literacy education is developing children’s love of books and reading. That’s because such love will manifest in patterns of lifelong learning via daily joyful reading of self-selected books and other media. But it’s not just having the books and media that will make a child a lifelong reader and learner. It’s […]

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The Game is Never Over!

Public schools in the U.S. on a traditional schedule are closing for the summer, with buses making their final run full of chattering children, excited to be finished with the school game for a few months. But unfortunately, this also is often the first day of the Summer Slide, the path taken by way too […]

Kids n Books

Celebrate and Engage in Learning from Cradle through Retirement

We are happily in the midst of the Week of the Young Child™, established by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). NAEYC invited us to join them April 8–12, 2019 for their yearly celebration of five fun-filled, themed days for families and educators of the youngest learners. This event is an annual celebration to spotlight early […]

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Reading test scores are in! (Sigh.)

Instead of using “reading” books, the recommendation is to fill classrooms with books rich in age-appropriate subject matter (e.g., science, mathematics, the social studies and humanities, the arts, etc.). The argument is that using books of random content designed for merely improving students’ reading test levels until 3rd grade haven’t worked for schools or children. The […]